Enterprise grade Java.
You'll read about Conferences, Java User Groups, Java, Integration, Reactive, Microservices and other technologies.

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Join me for the Reactive Microservices Roadshow

10:00 Wednesday, August 31, 2016 Posted by Unknown No comments:
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What are the benefits of the Reactive Manifesto and the Microservices approach, especially for those who want to fundamentally modernize their business? I will discuss this at the free event „Reactive Microservices Roadshow“, on 28th September in Berlin. The event is hosted by codecentric AG and Lightbend. There will be three talks which walk you through the most important parts.



Reaktive Mircroservices with Akka (Heiko Seeberger)
The Reactive Manifesto defines essential qualities which modern systems need to have in order to cope with today's requirements: Responsiveness, which is the cornerstone of usability and utility, requires resilience and elasticity; all of these are based upon asynchronous messaging. In this talk we look at the meaning of "Reactive" for a microservice architecture, for individual services and for their collaboration.

AutoScout24 goes Microservices (Christian Deger)
Fed up with stop and go in your data center? Why not shift into overdrive and pull into the fast lane? Learn how AutoScout24, the largest online car marketplace Europe-wide, are building their Autobahn in the cloud.
Reinventing themselves by making a radical transition from monoliths to microservices, from .NET on Windows to Scala on Linux, from data center to AWS and from built by devs and run by ops to a DevOps mindset.

One microservice is no microservice—they come in systems! (Markus Eisele)
Building a complete system out of individual Microservices is not as simple as we're being told. While Microservices-based Architecture continues to draw more and more attention we're also starting to learn about the trade-offs and drawbacks. Individual Microservices are fairly easy to understand and implement, but they only make sense as systems, and it is in-between the services that the most challenging (and interesting) problems arise—here we are entering the world of distributed systems.

Find a German event description on the codecentric.de website. Looking forward to interesting discussions! Make sure to REGISTER for FREE TODAY!

Lightbender at JavaOne 2016

07:20 Wednesday, August 31, 2016 Posted by Unknown No comments:
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It's only short 16 days until the Java community is starting to travel to San Francisco again. The annual family gathering at JavaOne is the place to be and it's time to get a little excited about attending once again. This year, Lightbend is a bronze sponsor and I am excited to be one of the featured speakers! A lot is going to happen during the week and you have to plan your schedule accordingly to get the most out of it.

A must attend are the sessions by Lightbend engineers.

Monitoring Reactive Microservices [CON1091] with Henrik Engström (@h3nk3)
Tuesday, Sep 20, 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. | Parc 55—Market Street
Reactive applications are the next major evolution of the internet. They allow for applications to be responsive, scalable, and resilient by building on a fully event-driven foundation. However, at the same time, this way of architecting systems introduces some new issues. One of these issues is how to monitor this type of system. This session covers the traditional monitoring approach and different ways to monitor asynchronous applications and finally looks at the way Lightbend has chosen to build a monitoring tool for reactive applications. After this presentation, developers will have a better understanding of how to monitor microservices in a reactive architecture.

End-to-End Reactive Streams, from Socket to Business [CON1852] with Konrad Malawski (@ktosopl)
Thursday, Sep 22, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. | Hilton—Continental Ballroom 1/2/3
The Reactive Streams specification, along with its TCK and various implementations such as Akka Streams, is coming closer and closer with the inclusion of the RS types in JDK 9. Using an example Twitter-like streaming service implementation, this session shows why this is a game changer in terms of how you can design reactive streaming applications by connecting pipelines of back-pressured asynchronous processing stages. The presentation looks at the example from two perspectives: a raw implementation and an implementation addressing a high-level business need.

Stay Productive While Slicing Up the Monolith [CON6472] with myself (@myfear)
Tuesday, Sep 20, 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. | Parc 55—Mission
With microservices-based architectures, developers are left alone with provisioning and continuous delivery systems, containers and resource schedulers, frameworks and patterns to slice monoliths. How to efficiently develop them without having to provision complete production-like environments locally by hand? How to run microservices-based systems on local development machines, managing provisioning and orchestration of hundreds of services from a command-line tool without sacrificing productivity enablers. New buzzwords, frameworks, and hyped tools have made Java developers forget what it means to be productive. This session shows how much fun it can be to develop large-scale microservices-based systems. Understand the power of a fully integrated microservices development environment.

One Microservice Is No Microservice: They Come in Systems [CON6471] with myself (@myfear)
Wednesday, Sep 21, 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | Parc 55—Embarcadero
Building a complete system out of individual microservices is hard. Microservices-based architecture is gaining attention, but there are trade-offs and drawbacks. Individual microservices are fairly easy to understand and implement, but they make sense only as systems; it’s between services that the most-challenging problems arise—in distributed systems. Slicing a system into REST services and wiring them back together with synchronous protocols and traditional enterprise tools means failure. This session distills the essence of microservices-based systems and covers a new development approach to microservices that gets you started quickly with a guided, minimalistic approach on your machine and takes you to a productive scaled-out microservices-based on the Oracle Cloud system with hundreds of services.

The Cloud-Natives Are RESTless [CON2514] Panel session with Konrad Malawski (@ktosopl)
Wednesday, Sep 21, 8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. | Parc 55—Powell I/II
Representational State Transfer—the REST architecture—has served us well for the past 15 years as a style of cross-language distributed computing that is web-friendly. REST is simple and cacheable and is implemented over the original protocol for the web, good ole HTTP. For many use cases, the synchronous, request/response nature of REST fits perfectly. What are the alternatives to REST for event-based Java microservices? What reactive frameworks should Java developers learn and use in their services and overall application architecture? What synchronous cross-language alternatives should Java engineers use for high-performance, non-HTTP distributed computing in 2016 and beyond? Attend this session to find out.

I am looking forward to meet all the amazing peers from the Java Community! Find more information on the official JavaOne website and on the JavaOne blog and make also sure to follow @JavaOneConf on Twitter. And also don't forget to follow @myfear and @lightbend for more fun and games and raffles and stuff during JavaOne!

Friday, August 5, 2016

Remote JMS with WildFly Swarm

09:16 Friday, August 5, 2016 Posted by Unknown No comments:
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I'm blogging about WildFly swarm again? Short version is: I needed a test for remote JMS access and refused to setup something complex like a complete application server. The idea was to have a simple WildFly Swarm application which has a queue and a topic configured. Both should be accessible remotely from a standalone Java application. While the topic receives messages a Message Driven Bean (MDB) dumps the output to the console. The queue is filled with random text+timestamp messages by a singleton timer bean.
Turned out, that WildFly Swarm can do it, but for now only in the snapshot release.

The code
Find the complete code on my GitHub repository. It's not the most beautiful thing I have written but it actually shows you the complete configuration of Swarm with the relevant security settings, and the construction of the queue and the topic. In short the MessagingFraction needs the relevant security settings with remote access enabled and it also needs to define the remote topic. The NamingFraction needs to enable the remote naming service and finally the ManagamentFraction needs to define authorization handler.

How to run the example
To run the server, you can just use 'mvn wildfly-swarm:run' after the startup, you see the timer bean starting to emit messages to the queue:

2016-08-05 08:44:48,003 INFO  [sample.SampleQueueTimer] (EJB default - 5) Send: Test 1470379488003
2016-08-05 08:44:49,005 INFO  [sample.SampleQueueTimer] (EJB default - 6) Send: Test 1470379489005

If you point your browser to http://localhost:8080/ you can trigger a single message being send to the topic. This also get's logged to the console:

2016-08-05 08:44:36,220 INFO  [sample.SampleTopicMDB] (Thread-250 (ActiveMQ-client-global-threads-859113460)) received: something

The real magic happens, when you look at the standalone Java client. It performs the relevant JNDI lookups and creates the JMS connection with user and password, the session and the producer and finally produces and sends a text message.
More about the "why the hell does he needs Java EE again" in some upcoming blog posts ;)

Credits
A super big thank you goes out to Ken Finnigan who fixed the issue I ran into literally over night!

Monday, August 1, 2016

Build and deploy microservices the modern way

15:53 Monday, August 1, 2016 Posted by Unknown No comments:
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There's been a lot of buzz from me lately around microservices and containers. And all the efforts were directed towards today's public announcement by Lightbend and Mesosphere. If you are interested in learning more about how traditional architectures are beginning to evolve very quickly to embrace microservices architecture and various cloud and hybrid-cloud deployment models, I would love to invite you to listen to the recording of my recent webinar with Aaron Williams from Mesosphere. Find the slides on slideshare, the recording is embedded below.

The traditional model that enterprises run their businesses on has typically been delivered as monolithic applications running in a virtualized, on-premise infrastructure. We’ve seen how public and private cloud technologies have changed everything, but if the applications are not designed, or re-designed, appropriately, then it is impossible to take advantage of the advances in both distributed application services and hybrid infrastructure. Consequently, we will show how enterprise architects are looking to microservices architecture and technologies like Mesosphere DC/OS as a means to modernize their legacy applications.

This webinar introduces Lagom, a new framework specifically designed to help developers modernize legacy Java EE applications into systems of microservices and then discuss exactly what is required to run these distributed systems at enterprise scale with DC/OS.