Enterprise grade Java.
You'll read about Conferences, Java User Groups, Java, Integration, Reactive, Microservices and other technologies.

Sunday, May 15, 2016

Modern Architecture with Containers, Microservices, and NoSQL

14:19 Sunday, May 15, 2016 Posted by Unknown No comments:
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On Tuesday, May 10, 2016 I had the pleasure to join Arun Gupta (Couchbase), Mano Marks (Docker) and Shane Johnson (Couchbase) for a great webinar with ADTMag. You can watch the complete replay for free after registration. This blog highlights some of the most prominent findings and provides a brief writeup.

After a short introduction of the main business drivers behind the new architectures and the panel by Arun Gupta, it was time for Mano Marks (@manomarks) from Docker to give an overview of the container hype. With applications changing from centralised server installations which very rarely got updated to loosely coupled services with a high update frequency running on my small servers, containers provide a standard format which is easily portable between environments. Docker provides a great ecosystem around their products and is a solid foundation for applications following the new principles.

After Mano, it was my part. I did an overview from where we came from in terms of monolithic applications and why they survived so long including their advantages. With the introduction of microservices or better "right-sized" services we finally start to build systems for flexibility
and resiliency, not just efficiency and robustness. The relevant aspects for a successful microservices architecture are plenty and not easily to be achieved by using a single framework. You also have to respect the architecture, software design, methodology and organisation and also embrace the distributed systems thinking. I introduced the audience to some available decomposition strategies and also gave a very quick rundown about the Lightbend microservice framework Lagom.

Shane finished the presentation part of the webinar with an overview about the capabilities of the Couchbase server and how it supports application modernisation and microservice base architectures. The following FaQ with all the panelists tried to answer some of the most pressuring audience questions.

The whole webinar runs for an hour and it is packed with all the latest information around modern architectures. With the additional minutes spend on an hour, this is pretty much the most recent information you can get on the topic by the top speakers in the field. If you have nothing to do on this rainy weekend I highly recommend to watch it!

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Developing Reactive Microservices with Java - My new free mini-book!

20:26 Wednesday, May 11, 2016 Posted by Unknown No comments:
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I am very happy to announce, that I finished another O'Reilly Mini-Book a couple of weeks ago. After the success of the very first edition which introduced you to the overall problem space of microservices and the amazing book by Jonas Bonér about the architecture of reactive microservice systems, it was about time to share a little more about how to implement them in Java. I am very proud to had Jonas write the foreword for this one and that I was able to write another 50+ pages in such a short time. The book uses Lagom as a framework to walk you through the service API, persistence API and how to work with Lagom-Services. Can't wait to hear your feedback and get you to try out Lagom. Here is the complete abstract and you'll find some further readings and links at the very bottom of the post. Did I mention, it is free to download? It is!

Abstract:
With microservices taking the software industry by storm, traditional enterprises running large, monolithic Java EE applications have been forced to rethink what they’ve been doing for nearly two decades. But how can microservices built upon reactive principles make a difference?

In this O’Reilly report, author Markus Eisele walks Java developers through the creation of a complete reactive microservices-based system. You’ll learn that while microservices are not new, the way in which these independent services can be distributed and connected back together certainly is. The result? A system that’s easier to deploy, manage, and scale than a typical Java EE-based infrastructure.

With this report, you will:

  • Get an overview of the Reactive Programming model and basic requirements for developing reactive microservices
  • Learn how to create base services, expose endpoints, and then connect them with a simple, web-based user interface
  • Understand how to deal with persistence, state, and clients
  • Use integration technologies to start a successful migration away from legacy systems
  • The detailed example in this report is based on Lagom, a new framework that helps you follow the requirements for building distributed, reactive systems. Available on GitHub as an Apache-licensed open source project, this example is freely available for download.


Markus Eisele is a Developer Advocate at Lightbend. He has worked with monolithic Java EE applications for more than 16 years, and now gives presentations at leading international tech conferences on how to evolve these applications into microservices-based architectures. Markus is the author of Modern Java EE Design Patterns (O’Reilly).