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Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Lightbender at JavaOne 2016

07:20 Wednesday, August 31, 2016 Posted by Markus Eisele
It's only short 16 days until the Java community is starting to travel to San Francisco again. The annual family gathering at JavaOne is the place to be and it's time to get a little excited about attending once again. This year, Lightbend is a bronze sponsor and I am excited to be one of the featured speakers! A lot is going to happen during the week and you have to plan your schedule accordingly to get the most out of it.

A must attend are the sessions by Lightbend engineers.

Monitoring Reactive Microservices [CON1091] with Henrik Engström (@h3nk3)
Tuesday, Sep 20, 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. | Parc 55—Market Street
Reactive applications are the next major evolution of the internet. They allow for applications to be responsive, scalable, and resilient by building on a fully event-driven foundation. However, at the same time, this way of architecting systems introduces some new issues. One of these issues is how to monitor this type of system. This session covers the traditional monitoring approach and different ways to monitor asynchronous applications and finally looks at the way Lightbend has chosen to build a monitoring tool for reactive applications. After this presentation, developers will have a better understanding of how to monitor microservices in a reactive architecture.

End-to-End Reactive Streams, from Socket to Business [CON1852] with Konrad Malawski (@ktosopl)
Thursday, Sep 22, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. | Hilton—Continental Ballroom 1/2/3
The Reactive Streams specification, along with its TCK and various implementations such as Akka Streams, is coming closer and closer with the inclusion of the RS types in JDK 9. Using an example Twitter-like streaming service implementation, this session shows why this is a game changer in terms of how you can design reactive streaming applications by connecting pipelines of back-pressured asynchronous processing stages. The presentation looks at the example from two perspectives: a raw implementation and an implementation addressing a high-level business need.

Stay Productive While Slicing Up the Monolith [CON6472] with myself (@myfear)
Tuesday, Sep 20, 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. | Parc 55—Mission
With microservices-based architectures, developers are left alone with provisioning and continuous delivery systems, containers and resource schedulers, frameworks and patterns to slice monoliths. How to efficiently develop them without having to provision complete production-like environments locally by hand? How to run microservices-based systems on local development machines, managing provisioning and orchestration of hundreds of services from a command-line tool without sacrificing productivity enablers. New buzzwords, frameworks, and hyped tools have made Java developers forget what it means to be productive. This session shows how much fun it can be to develop large-scale microservices-based systems. Understand the power of a fully integrated microservices development environment.

One Microservice Is No Microservice: They Come in Systems [CON6471] with myself (@myfear)
Wednesday, Sep 21, 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | Parc 55—Embarcadero
Building a complete system out of individual microservices is hard. Microservices-based architecture is gaining attention, but there are trade-offs and drawbacks. Individual microservices are fairly easy to understand and implement, but they make sense only as systems; it’s between services that the most-challenging problems arise—in distributed systems. Slicing a system into REST services and wiring them back together with synchronous protocols and traditional enterprise tools means failure. This session distills the essence of microservices-based systems and covers a new development approach to microservices that gets you started quickly with a guided, minimalistic approach on your machine and takes you to a productive scaled-out microservices-based on the Oracle Cloud system with hundreds of services.

The Cloud-Natives Are RESTless [CON2514] Panel session with Konrad Malawski (@ktosopl)
Wednesday, Sep 21, 8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. | Parc 55—Powell I/II
Representational State Transfer—the REST architecture—has served us well for the past 15 years as a style of cross-language distributed computing that is web-friendly. REST is simple and cacheable and is implemented over the original protocol for the web, good ole HTTP. For many use cases, the synchronous, request/response nature of REST fits perfectly. What are the alternatives to REST for event-based Java microservices? What reactive frameworks should Java developers learn and use in their services and overall application architecture? What synchronous cross-language alternatives should Java engineers use for high-performance, non-HTTP distributed computing in 2016 and beyond? Attend this session to find out.

I am looking forward to meet all the amazing peers from the Java Community! Find more information on the official JavaOne website and on the JavaOne blog and make also sure to follow @JavaOneConf on Twitter. And also don't forget to follow @myfear and @lightbend for more fun and games and raffles and stuff during JavaOne!