Blogging about software development for the enterprise. Strong focus on Java Enterprise Edition (Java EE) and more general Java platforms.
You'll read a lot about Conferences, Java User Groups, Java EE, Integration, AS7, WildFly, EAP and other technologies that hit my road.

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Oracle and Sun

07:09 Tuesday, April 21, 2009 Posted by Markus Eisele
,
There is not much time these days to write blogposts. But this one is needed:
After the speculations about IBM buying SUN, now it's official: Oracle took over Sun. As announced yesterday this is subject to Sun stockholder approval, certain regulatory approvals and customary closing conditions. Oracle is expecting the transaction to close this summer.

Taken from the FaQ:

Oracle’s ownership of two key Sun software assets, Java and Solaris, is expected to provide our customers with significant benefit. Java is one of the computer industry’s best known brands and most widely deployed technologies. Oracle Fusion Middleware is built on top of Sun’s Java language and software. Oracle can now ensure continued innovation and investment in Java technology for the benefit of customers and the Java community.


What are the most relevant products for Java/JEE developer and what is going to happen with them?

  • MySQL:

  • MySQL will be an addition to Oracle’s existing suite of database products, which already includes Oracle Database 11g, TimesTen, Berkeley DB open source database, and the open source transactional storage engine, InnoDB.



My first open questions (feel free to add your oppinion)

  • What will happen to the JCP?

  • How will Java/JEE evolve in the future?

  • What about NetBeans, IntelliJ, Weblogic Workshop, OEPE?

  • What will happen to Glassfish and Weblogic Server?

  • Will Oracle realy offer an Office Suite? ;)

Wednesday, April 1, 2009

Logging in WebSphere Application Server Community Edition

05:17 Wednesday, April 1, 2009 Posted by Markus Eisele
, , , ,
WebSphere Application Server Community Edition (WAS CE) provides several ways to configure application logging, using java.util.logging, Log4j and SLF4j APIs. Though the steps to configure these logging services are to large extent independent of any application server, WebSphere Application Server requires certain tweaks to get your desired logging behavior.
The new tutorial on developerworks from Phani Madgula walks you through these tweaks coupled with sample applications. WebSphere Application Server Community Edition is freely available for download, so you can get started in just a few minutes.